First week at work lunch time selfie.  (at New Modcloth Hq)

First week at work lunch time selfie. (at New Modcloth Hq)

I got some amazing love letters from some amazing campers.

I got some amazing love letters from some amazing campers.

halftheskymovement:

Girls Rock! Chicago (GR!C) wrapped its ninth year of teaching campers ages 8 to 16 how to play instruments, mix and record music, produce and collaborate. “Music is just a medium for other stuff — it’s about putting kids in a positive environment, building community, building self-esteem,” says GR!C outreach director, Melissa Oglesby. A typical day for campers includes a morning assembly, instrument lessons, a workshop and band practice. At the end of the week, the campers perform an end-of-camp show at a local venue and later record an album in a studio. “Before Girls Rock I was really, really quiet. I think it helped socially and educationally,” says Xeene Bain, who started at the one-week-a-year camp when she was just 9.  Now 17, Bain said her camp experience also helped her become comfortable with gender issues and respectful of “what other people have to say.” Read more via The Huffington Post.

halftheskymovement:

Girls Rock! Chicago (GR!C) wrapped its ninth year of teaching campers ages 8 to 16 how to play instruments, mix and record music, produce and collaborate. “Music is just a medium for other stuff — it’s about putting kids in a positive environment, building community, building self-esteem,” says GR!C outreach director, Melissa Oglesby.

A typical day for campers includes a morning assembly, instrument lessons, a workshop and band practice. At the end of the week, the campers perform an end-of-camp show at a local venue and later record an album in a studio.

“Before Girls Rock I was really, really quiet. I think it helped socially and educationally,” says Xeene Bain, who started at the one-week-a-year camp when she was just 9.  Now 17, Bain said her camp experience also helped her become comfortable with gender issues and respectful of “what other people have to say.”

Read more via The Huffington Post.

We did it! @girlsrockpittsburgh August Showcase was a success.

We did it! @girlsrockpittsburgh August Showcase was a success.

Such a good day! I got accepted to attend @tedxhotmetal and @girlsrockpittsburgh is today!

Such a good day! I got accepted to attend @tedxhotmetal and @girlsrockpittsburgh is today!

I can’t believe it’s the last day of @girlsrockpittsburgh Rock Camp before he Showcase! I already miss my campers.

I can’t believe it’s the last day of @girlsrockpittsburgh Rock Camp before he Showcase! I already miss my campers.

radicalpostbacc:

pgdigs:

1982: Pittsburgh’s first feminist bar, bistro and cabaret

Pittsburgh residents have always had a thirst for ale, good coffee and strong spirits.

James O’Hara, one of the city’s early settlers, was a successful businessman and real estate investor who, by 1803, was operating the Point Brewery on land now occupied by Point State Park.

In 1969, gay men and lesbians rioted outside the Stonewall inn in New York’s Greenwich Village. The women’s rights movement was in full flower and by the spring of 1975, local feminists wanted a place where women’s art could be seen and their voices heard.

So, they organized the Wild Sisters Coffeehouse to provide a performance venue that would showcase women artists, poets and musicians. Among the 15 founders were Dana Ventriglia, a trained carpenter, local lawyer Ann Begler and Felice Newman, then a University of Pittsburgh student and published poet. The coffeehouses were staged in various locations, including the Chatham College Chapel.

By July of 1982, the dedicated, determined women had raised nearly $55,000, enough to buy a liquor license and a South Side building located at 2700 Jane Street. The women invested lots of sweat equity by painting, sanding and plastering their new property.  Interior designer Janice Lott did the floor plan for the new establishment. Wild Sisters,  the first feminist bar, cabaret and restaurant in Pittsburgh, opened in 1982 .

Mary Pat Donegan, a psychotherapist, was president.

"When we first started, we put one ad in the newspapers — ‘Women Artists Wanted’ — and since that time we’ve been flooded by requests," Ms. Donegan told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in a 1982 interview.

Wild Sisters welcomed women and men. Patrons could get a drink, a bowl of soup, a piece of quiche or a sandwich and listen to music. The venue opened long before the letters LGBT entered the daily vernacular of American language.

John G. Craig Jr., the late editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, mentioned Wild Sisters in a column he wrote on July 27, 1985.

He called it “a South Side bistro with a sympathy for a liberated clientele.”

Wild Sisters closed in 1985 and became Bloomer’s, a bar, music venue and space for women’s art.  Next, the building hosted two Italian restaurants and a Mexican taqueria. Today, it is home to the Hot Metal Bridge Faith Community.

— Marylynne Pitz

Top picture: Interior of Wild Sisters, a restaurant and bar for women located on the South Side at 27th and Jane streets. (Post-Gazette photo)

@ariellecohen

Thanks radicalpostbacc!

There are a zillion ways to get to @girlsrockpittsburgh! Some bike, some bus one camper came all the way from Ohio!

There are a zillion ways to get to @girlsrockpittsburgh! Some bike, some bus one camper came all the way from Ohio!