And I, too, said nothing, showed nothing; I didn’t open my mouth, I didn’t repaint my half of the world. I was ashamed. I was afraid, and I swallowed my shame and my fear. I said to myself: You are mad! What’s the meaning of these waves, these floods, these outbursts? Where is the ebullient, infinite woman who, immersed as she was in her naivete, kept in the dark about herself, led into self-disdain by the great
arm of parental-conjugal phallocentrism, hasn’t been ashamed of her strength? Who, surprised and horrified by the fantastic tumult of her
drives (for she was made to believe that a well-adjusted normal woman has a … divine composure), hasn’t accused herself of being a monster? Who, feeling a funny desire stirring inside her (to sing, to write, to dare
to speak, in short, to bring out something new), hasn’t thought she was sick? Well, her shameful sickness is that she resists death, that she makes trouble.

"The Laugh of the Medusa" 

Hélène Cixous

I write woman: woman must write woman. And man, man. So only an oblique consideration will be found here of man; it’s up to him to say where his masculinity and femininity are at: this will concern us once men have opened their eyes and seen themselves clearly.
Now women return from afar, from always: from “without,” from the heath where witches are kept alive; from below, from beyond “cul- ture”; from their childhood which men have been trying desperately to make them forget, condemning it to “eternal rest.” The little girls and their “ill-mannered” bodies immured, well-preserved, intact unto them- selves, in the mirror. Frigidified. But are they ever seething underneath! What an effort it takes-there’s no end to it-for the sex cops to bar their threatening return. Such a display of forces on both sides that the struggle has for centuries been immobilized in the trembling equilibrium of a deadlock.

Here they are, returning, arriving over and again, because the un- conscious is impregnable. They have wandered around in circles,
confined to the narrow room in which they’ve been given a deadly brainwashing. You can incarcerate them, slow them down, get away with the old Apartheid routine, but for a time only. As soon as they begin to speak, at the same time as they’re taught their name, they can be taught that their territory is black: because you are Africa, you are black. Your continent is dark. Dark is dangerous. You can’t see anything in the dark, you’re afraid. Don’t move, you might fall. Most of all, don’t go into the forest. And so we have internalized this horror of the dark.

Men have committed the greatest crime against women. Insidiously, violently, they have led them to hate women, to be their own enemies, to mobilize their immense strength against themselves, to be the executants of their virile needs. They have made for women an antinarcissism! A narcissism which loves itself only to be loved for what women haven’t got! They have constructed the infamous logic of antilove.

We the precocious, we the repressed of culture, our lovely mouths gagged with pollen, our wind knocked out of us, we the labyrinths, the ladders, the trampled spaces, the bevies-we are black and we are beautiful.

We’re stormy, and that which is ours breaks loose from us without
our fearing any debilitation. Our glances, our smiles, are spent; laughs exude from all our mouths; our blood flows and we extend ourselves without ever reaching an end; we never hold back our thoughts, our signs, our writing; and we’re not afraid of lacking.

What happiness for us who are omitted, brushed aside at the scene
of inheritances; we inspire ourselves and we expire without running out of breath, we are everywhere!
From now on, who, if we say so, can say no to us? We’ve come back from always.

Hélène Cixous-  ”The Laugh of the Medusa”

Photo from a 1938 issue of National Geographic captioned, “Anne and her family lived alone on an island. She enjoyed having tea time with her friends the spiny lobster and baby hawk.”

Photo from a 1938 issue of National Geographic captioned, “Anne and her family lived alone on an island. She enjoyed having tea time with her friends the spiny lobster and baby hawk.”

thearenamaster:

In September of 1973 Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks released their first album simply titled “Buckingham Nicks”. To this day it remains a prime example of just how good rock and roll can sound.

First week at work lunch time selfie.  (at New Modcloth Hq)

First week at work lunch time selfie. (at New Modcloth Hq)